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Posts for: May, 2014

By Kevin L. Ragsdale, D.D.S.
May 27, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: osteoporosis  
YourOsteoporosisTreatmentCouldAffectYourToothRestorationOptions

Your skeletal system plays an essential role in your physical well-being. Not only do bones physically support the body and protect internal organs, they also store minerals, produce blood cells and help regulate the body’s pH balance.

As dynamic, living tissue, bone goes through a normal cycle of removing old, ineffective areas (a process called resorption), followed by the formation of new bone to replace it. For most adults, the two sides of this cycle are roughly balanced. But with age and other factors, the scale may tip in favor of resorption. Over time the bone will become weaker and less dense, a condition known as osteoporosis.

One common approach in treatment for osteoporosis is a class of drugs known as bisphosphonates. Taken orally, bisphosphonates act to slow the bone’s resorption rate and restore balance to the bone’s natural regenerative cycle. But while effective for osteoporosis, it could affect your oral health, particularly if you are considering dental implants.

Long-term users of bisphosphonates can develop osteonecrosis, a condition where isolated areas of bone lose their vitality and die. This has implications for dental implants if it arises in the jawbone. Implants require an adequate amount of bone structure for proper anchorage; due to the effects of osteonecrosis, there may not be enough viable bone to support an implant.

Of course, the treatment for osteoporosis varies from patient to patient according to each particular case. Another effective treatment is a synthetic hormone called teriparitide, a manufactured version of a naturally occurring parathyroid hormone. Daily injections of teriparitide have been shown to slow resorption and stimulate new bone growth. And unlike bisphosphonates, researchers have found no link between the use of teriparitide and osteonecrosis.

If you are undergoing treatment for osteoporosis and are also considering dental implants, you should discuss the matter with your healthcare team, including your physician, dentist and dental specialists. Understanding how the treatment for your osteoporosis could affect your dental health will help you make informed decisions about your overall care and future dental needs.

If you would like more information on how osteoporosis may affect your oral health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Osteoporosis & Dental Implants.”


By Kevin L. Ragsdale, D.D.S.
May 12, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
50CentHasHisOwnStyle-EveninHisSmile

On his way to the top of the urban contemporary charts, the musician, actor and entrepreneur known as 50 Cent (born Curtis James Jackson III) earned his street credibility the hard way; his rise from youthful poverty to present-day stardom is chronicled in many of his rhymes. So when it came time for the rapper to have cosmetic work performed on his teeth, he insisted on doing it in his own way.

“I told [the dentist] to leave [my front teeth] a little bigger than the other ones, because I need to still see me when I look in the mirror,” he told his co-host on the New York radio station Power 105.1. “Don't give me no whole ’noter guy — I like me!”

We understand how 50 Cent feels — in fact, we think it's a perfectly reasonable request.

Cosmetic dentistry has come a long way in recent years, as we strive to meet the increasing expectations of our patients. We realize that different people have different perceptions of what makes a smile attractive — and that in dental aesthetics, beauty really is in the eye of the beholder. That's why, before we begin cosmetic work, we want to hear what you like and don't like about your smile as it is now. In addition, we can also perform what is called a “smile analysis.”

This procedure doesn't cause any discomfort — but it's a crucial part of cosmetic enhancement. In doing the analysis, we look at the various parts of an individual's smile: the spacing, size and alignment of the teeth; the health and position of the gum line; the relationship of the upper and lower jaws; and the relative shape and size of the face. All of these features combine to make a person's smile unique. By looking at them closely, we can help determine the best way for you to improve your smile.

But how can you tell if the cosmetic changes you're contemplating will end up being just right for you? Fortunately, with today's technology, it's easier than ever. Computer imaging offers a chance to visualize the final outcome before we start working on your teeth; it's even possible to offer previews of different treatment options. If you want to go a bit further, we may be able to show you a full-scale model of your new smile.

In some situations, we can even perform a provisional restoration — that is, a trial version of the new smile, made with less permanent materials. If the “temporary” smile looks, feels, and functions just right, then the permanent one will too. If not, it's still possible to make changes that will make it work even better.

Whether you're thinking about having teeth whitening, cosmetic bonding, porcelain veneers, or dental implants to improve your smile, you probably have a picture in your mind of how the end result should look. Will your teeth be perfectly even and “Hollywood white” — or more “natural,” with slight variations in size, spacing and color allowed? Either way, we can help you get the smile you've always wanted.

If you would like more information about smile makeovers and options in cosmetic dentistry, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Cosmetic Dentistry.”


By Kevin L. Ragsdale, D.D.S.
May 02, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
FrequentlyAskedQuestionsAboutDentalImplants

Q: I’ve heard about dental implants, but I’m still not sure exactly what they are. Can you explain?
A: It’s no wonder you’ve heard of them: Dental implants have been called the most exciting advance in dentistry in the last 50 years! Essentially, the implant itself is a small, screw-shaped post that is placed in the jaw bone (underneath the gums), and serves as a replacement for the tooth’s roots. It is attached to a lifelike crown (a replacement for the visible part of the tooth) via a sturdy connector called an abutment. Dental implants offer results that can last a lifetime, and have the highest documented success rate of any tooth replacement system — over 95%.

Q: How does a dental implant work?
A: A few decades ago, it was discovered that titanium metal has a unique property: It can actually become fused to living bone tissue in a process called osseointegration. Implants are made of titanium, and take advantage of this feature. Solidly anchored in place by both osseointegration and mechanical forces, dental implants provide a strong and durable base for several different kinds of natural-looking and fully functional replacement teeth.

Q: What are dental implants used for?
A: One dental implant can be used to replace just one missing tooth with a crown that matches your own teeth. Two or more dental implants can be used to support a fixed bridge (a series of three or more replacement teeth) without requiring any work to be done on the adjacent, healthy teeth. Four or more implants can support an entire arch (complete top or bottom set) of replacement teeth that won’t slip and will never need to be removed — a great alternative to traditional removable dentures! Implants can also be used to support some kinds of removable dentures, and in certain orthodontic procedures.

Q: What is the procedure for getting a dental implant?
A: The implant process begins with a consultation, a thorough exam, and a set of diagnostic images. Placing one or more implants involves minor surgery, which is typically performed in the dental office and requires only local anesthesia. After the area has been numbed, a small opening is made in the tissue of gums and jaw bone, and the implant is carefully inserted. In some situations, a temporary replacement tooth may be placed on the implant immediately; otherwise, the implant will be allowed to rest for a period of weeks. In either case, the permanent replacement teeth will be secured to the implants at a subsequent visit.

Q: What are the advantages of an implant over other tooth replacement methods?
A: We already mentioned the high success rate and the long life of dental implants. Another advantage is the fact that implants stop the deterioration of bone in the jaw that inevitably follows tooth loss. Bone loss, a “hidden” consequence of tooth loss, is what tends to make people who are missing teeth look older than they really are. Implants need no special care beyond what you would give your natural teeth, and their longevity can make them a cost-effective investment in the long term. Plus, they look, function and “feel” just like your natural teeth.

If you’d like to find out more about dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also read the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Dental Implants” and “The Hidden Consequences of Losing Teeth.”




Kevin L. Ragsdale, D.D.S.

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